Bowers Museum: Dia de Los Muertos

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Bowers Museum: Dia de Los Muertos

Traditional Mexican performers give their last performance of the day.

Traditional Mexican performers give their last performance of the day.

Photograph by Keerthi Nair

Traditional Mexican performers give their last performance of the day.

Photograph by Keerthi Nair

Photograph by Keerthi Nair

Traditional Mexican performers give their last performance of the day.

Keerthi Nair, Staff Writer

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On Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017, Bowers Museum hosted a Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Celebration, commemorating the ancestors of families residing in Southern California. The day consisted of multiple performances that showcased the rich Mexican culture that is an integral part of the Southern California community.

 

The celebrations started at 11 a.m. with face painting booths and art stations. Children and adults could purchase and decorate a calavera de azucar, a sugar skull. Additionally, traditional foods and drinks like Mexican hot chocolate and pan de muerto, bread of the dead, were sold at the concession stands. At 12 p.m., local organizations performed traditional music and dances. The Orange County Mariachi Kids were up first and played rancheras, a type of Mexican country music played with guitar and horns. The performance was followed by a traditional Mexican dance, Danza Azteca. The dancers wore intricate headpieces decorated with feathers. Inside the museum, classical guitarist, Joel Aceves, performed songs while guests visited stations that highlighted elements of Mexican culture and heritage. The exhibition enabled visitors to gain a deeper understanding of Mexico’s history and the origins of the festival.

 

There was also an ofrenda, offerings on a ritual altar, set up near the ticket counter. The altar was covered with notes from relatives and pictures of loved ones lost.      

 

Bowers Museum was able to showcase the authenticity of this holiday through a variety of performances and stands that were set up around the museum. People of all ages were present, whether it be someone’s great grandma or a two-month-old baby. It was a place where people from all over the world were able to come together and enjoy a Mexican tradition that dedicated a whole day toward their loved ones.

 

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